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GRACIA HABY & LOUISE JENNISON

Gracia Haby, A blue faced female black-naped Monarch whispers the secrets of the world to me but I am unimpressed. 2006, collage, 9.65  x 15cm

Louise Jennison, A polar bear with floatation devices, to help save her from drowning, watercolour and pencil on Rising Stonehenge cream 100% cotton 245gsm paper, 14 x 9cm

If we stand very still, no one will notice.
GRACIA HABY & LOUISE JENNISON

20 FEBRUARY – 20 APRIL 2007

Gracia Haby and Louise Jennison work together as a collaborative duo on various joint ventures, and have been doing so since 1999. Using paper as their primary medium to create an ongoing series of limited edition artists’ books, several lithographic offset prints, and even sculptural objects folded, cut and molded into shape, as well as a host of zines created on the photocopy machine, their upcoming exhibition at Mailbox 141, ‘If we stand very still, no one will notice’, features collage works on original postcards collected from various countries neither have visited, and watercolour and pencil drawings on paper. Set to take place in the seventeen small wooden mailboxes, for a period of two months, small scale, imaginary journeys and endangered animals will once again take centre stage. Polar bears sporting bright yellow floatation devices, to aid them in their long arctic swims, jostle for space alongside owls bearing precious gemstones, whilst miniature oncillas from South America, assist with the untying of ones eyelashes. These new works, some of which have been created on postcards from days gone by, will be ‘posted’ in the glass fronted mailboxes, one on top of the other, seemingly as though they have just recently been delivered and are now awaiting collection. A delicate, loosely constructed, handful of mail, depicting imaginary lands where pink diamonds litter the Japanese skyline, and newly found companions are not to be trusted. Together, as a team, they construct miniature worlds that seek to eke out a space removed from its original context. Themes previously only touched upon in recent artists’ books, continue to hold sway.